May’s Gov Reshuffle

Prime Minister Theresa May busy Monday night reshaping her government team, keeping virtually all of her big-name ministers in place.

Day long procession of politicians strode along Downing Street to enter through the black-glossy door of Number 10 to hear their fates.

Former government minister Rob Wilson described the day’s events as the “most low-key, boring reshuffles for some years.”

Writing in the Daily Telegraph, Wilson added: “That’s not necessarily a bad thing if you are a prime minister with little room for manoeuvre and a clear need not to put more malcontent ex-Ministers on the backbenches.”

The main opposition Labour Party described the re-shuffle as “re-arranging the deckchairs”.May started her re-shuffle when it was announced that Education Secretary Justine Greening was resigning. It was reported that Greening decided to go after refusing May’s offer as Works and Pensions Secretary.

Chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond, Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson and Home Secretary Amber Rudd, all kept their jobs.

MP Matt Hancock was promoted to become the new culture secretary, replacing Karen Bradley. Bradley has been made Northern Ireland Secretary succeeding James Brokenshire who announced earlier Monday he was resigning on health grounds.

The change in personnel, which formed part of a wider cabinet reshuffle by May, could complicate moves to restart talks in the coming weeks to avoid a return to direct rule from London for the first time in a decade.
Northern Ireland has been without a regional government for almost a year, destabilising the delicate balance between Irish nationalists and pro-British unionists that has been shaken by Britain’s June 2016 vote to leave the European Union.

David Lidington has switched from his role as Justice Secretary to become Damian Green’s replacement as Minister for the Cabinet Office, David Gauke, the former secretary of state for work and pensions, takes over as justice secretary. Brandon Lewis was promoted, becoming the chairman of the Conservative Party, replacing veteran politician Patrick McLoughlin who resigned from the government.

 

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