World Happiness Report 2018: India’s rank slips to 133rd  in 2018

India’s rank slips to 133rd  in 2018 from 122nd  in 2017 on World Happiness Index 2018 :  World Happiness Report 2018

 

 

UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network’s (SDSN) World Happiness Report 2018 notes that  Finland, rose from fifth place last year to oust Norway from the top spot. The 2018 top-10, as ever dominated by the Nordics, is: Finland, Norway, Denmark, Iceland, Switzerland, Netherlands Canada, New Zealand, Sweden and Australia.

 

The World Happiness Report is a landmark survey of the state of global happiness. The Report ranks 156 countries by their happiness levels, and 117 countries by the happiness of their immigrants according to things such as GDP per capita, social support, healthy life expectancy, social freedom, generosity and absence of corruption.

 

                                                                                     Ranking of Happiness 2015–2017

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Source: World Happiness Report 2018, United Nations Sustainable Development Solutions Network

 

The analysis of happiness changes from 2008-2010 to 2015-2015 shows Togo as the biggest gainer, moving up 17 places in the overall rankings from the last place position it held as recently as in the 2015 rankings. The biggest loser is Venezuela, down 2.2 points on the 0 to 10 scale.

 

Top 14 Countries in the  Ranking of Happiness 2015–2017

S.No.

Country

Ranking

1

Finland

1

2

Norway

2

3

Denmark

3

4

Iceland

4

5

Switzerland

5

6

Netherlands

6

7

Canada

7

8

New Zealand

8

9

Sweden

9

10

Australia

10

11

Israel

11

12

Austria

12

13

Costa Rica

13

14

Ireland

14

15

Germany

15

16

India

133

Source: World Happiness Report 2018, United Nations Sustainable Development Solutions Network

 

International Migration and World Happiness

 

For both domestic and international migrants, the report studies not just the happiness of the migrants and their host communities, but also of those left behind, whether in the countryside or in the source country. The results are generally positive.

Perhaps the most striking finding of the whole report is that a ranking of countries according to the happiness of their immigrant populations is almost exactly the same as for the rest of the population. The immigrant happiness rankings are based on the full span of Gallup data from 2005 to 2017, sufficient to have 117 countries with more than 100 immigrant respondents.

The ten happiest countries in the overall rankings also ll ten of the top eleven spots in the ranking of immigrant happiness. Finland is at the top of both rankings in this report, with the happiest immigrants, and the happiest population in general.

 

Rural-Urban Migration and Happiness in China

The report studies rural-urban migration as well, principally through the recent Chinese experience, which has been called the greatest mass migration in history. That migration shows some of the same convergence characteristics of the international experience, with the happiness of city-bound migrants moving towards, but still falling below urban averages.

 

Rural-Urban Migrant, Rural Hukou and Urban Hukou Mean Household Income per Capita and Mean Happiness Score

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Source: World Happiness Report 2018, United Nations Sustainable Development Solutions Network

 

Happiness and International Migration in Latin America

The importance of social factors in the happiness of all populations, whether migrant or not the happiness bulge in Latin America is found to depend on the greater warmth of family and other social relationships there, and to the greater importance that people there attach to these relationships.

 

America’s Health Crisis and the Easterlin Paradox

The most striking fact about happiness in America is the Easterlin Paradox: income per capita has more than doubled since 1972 while happiness (or subjective well-being, SWB) has remained roughly unchanged or has even declined.

Average Happiness and GDP Per Capita, 1972–2016

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Source: World Happiness Report 2018, United Nations Sustainable Development Solutions Network

India’s rank slipped to 133rd in 2018 from 122nd in 2017

India was ranked at 133 in the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network’s (SDSN) 2018 World Happiness Report which ranked 156 countries according to things such as GDP per capita, social support, healthy life expectancy, social freedom, generosity and absence of corruption.

It slipped 11 places as it was placed 122nd last year, which was a drop from 118th rank the preceding year. It was behind the majority of South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (Saarc) nations, apart from war-ravaged Afghanistan, that stood at 145.

Among the eight SAARC nations, Pakistan was at 75th position, up five spots from last year. Nepal stood at 101, Bhutan at 97, Bangladesh at 115 while Sri Lanka was at 116. India’s other testy neighbor, China, was also far ahead at 86th spot.

Among BRICS, India stood at 133rd position followed by South Africa at 105th, China at 86th, Russia at 59th and Brazil at 28Th.

 

Ranking of Happiness 2015–2017 in BRICS economies

Source: World Happiness Report 2018, United Nations Sustainable Development Solutions Network

The Report ends on a different tack, with a focus on three emerging health problems that threaten happiness: obesity, the opioid crisis, and depression. Although set in a global context, most of the evidence and discussion are focused on the United States, where the prevalence of all three problems has been growing faster and further than in most other countries.

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